“I was seeing another application, but it’s over now, it was just a fling”

– Me, to Evernote.

I’m having trouble being totally loyal to my applications. I’m always looking for the next-latest-greatest-whiz-bang-cure-the-world-of-all-its-problems application. And guess what? I still haven’t found it yet. Yet.

Why can’t I just be content with the apps that I have and not let the bells and whistles distract me? After all, it should be about the end product. It should be about the fact that I got here, I produced the end product, I used a reliable way to get to here. It shouldn’t matter what color my vehicle is that got me here. It shouldn’t matter if the stereo is Bluetooth or hardwired, as long as it plays my podcasts and Spotify playlists (or Pandora, there I go again!).


I tend to be swayed by the digital wind of other people’s application habits. Want an example? No? Okay…here’s one anyway.

I use Evernote to save my tangible world into digital bits. I can search my digital bits, sort my digital bits, add to my digital bits, tag my digital bits…ahhh…my precious (too far?).

Pixabay.com

Yesterday, I had the day off to celebrate President’s Day (woohoo Presidents). Don’t comment about your political affiliation here, it was enough to have a chill-day. With this day off, I obviously had too much unsupervised-time (as my wife views it) because I ended up questioning my use of Evernote over some other applications.

I should mention that I also use Evernote to write. For instance, this article is being written in Evernote. But again, as someone with an insatiable appetite for the new-shiny things, I was distracted by a writer’s opinion of using another app that they found better suited to them than Evernote.

First off, now that I think about it, the person may not have even been a real writer (you define that). Second off, now that I think some more about it, the person could have been an employee of the other application. Third off, now that I’m really thinking about it, really really, this could have just been a teenager with an affiliate link to the application. My head hurts now.

Photo by imgix on Unsplash

Of course I took the shiny, new application and installed it on my iPhone, my iPad, and my MacBook Air (Full Disclosure: I own Apple products). It synced so fast! It had a Chrome extension that worked pretty close to the Web Clipper that Evernote offers! It did most everything the same that Evernote did for me! The difference? A teensy-amount of a learning curve and a new paint job!

I went ahead and bought the application (subscription model, with one week trial). Wow, how exciting! Now to migrate all my Evernote data into the new app. A little searching on the internet and few keystrokes later and boom, migration complete!

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Sitting and staring at my new application, I felt like the proud new owner of a new car. It only took me an hour or so to do all of this; an hour to change over to another platform that “almost” performs in a way that I was used to, enjoyed, and was comfortable with. An hour of trying to get the new application to look and feel the same as the old application. An hour to set up all of my information to be accessible…the…same…as…the…old…application. Sigh…fail.

Back to the dealership (App Store). Cancel the lease on my new application and pick up my old application. Luckily the application hadn’t been scrapped yet (deleted by me).


Lesson learned. If you are trying to find something to replace the something that is working just fine; don’t. That new something needs to be an improvement of the old something or at best be something that the old something wasn’t or couldn’t be. In all, what I lost was time.

I’m in my 50s now. I need to make sure and pick my somethings carefully and make sure that the something is of enough value that it gives me back my time, not something that takes it.

Pixabay.com

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